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  • Saving livestock by thinking like a predator Saving livestock by thinking like a predatorFor predators like wolves, cougars and snow leopards, a cow or sheep out to pasture may make for an easy and tasty meal. But when wild animals eat livestock, farmers face the traumatic loss of food or income, frequently sparking lethal conflicts between humans and their carnivorous neighbors. Humans have struggled to reduce the loss of ...
  • Beavers cut flooding and pollution and boost wildlife populations Beavers cut flooding and pollution and boost wildlife populationsBeavers have alleviated flooding, reduced pollution and boosted populations of fish, amphibians and other wildlife, according to a five-year study of wild-living animals in Devon. The report, which will help the government decide whether to allow wild beavers to return to England after being hunted to extinction more than 400 years ago, concludes that the species has ...
  • Even after death, animals are important in ecosystems Even after death, animals are important in ecosystemsUnlike deadwood, the sight of carcasses in nature is hardly accepted. A shame, the researchers think.  Animal carcasses play an important role in biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems, also over prolonged periods. Scientists from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the University of Groningen have published these findings in the journal PLOS ONE. ...
  • Tiny Woodlands Are More Important Than Previously Thought Tiny Woodlands Are More Important Than Previously ThoughtSmall woodlands in farmland have more benefits for humans per area, compared to large forests, according to a new study. The small woodlands, sometimes even smaller than a football field, can easily go unnoticed in agricultural landscapes. Yet, these small forest remnants can store more carbon in the topsoil layer, are more suitable for hunting ...
  • Climate change and biodiversity Climate change and biodiversityWe hear much talking about climate change – and we experience changes in our local weather, probably resulting from the global changes. The other actual and global problem, loss of biodiversity, gets less attention, but may be more severe in the future: many organisms - and certainly humans – can adapt to changes and survive ...
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